A firm known for its focus on intellectual property looks to China and other key Asian markets to expand its client base. 

CCBJ: Fish opened a representative office in Shenzhen, China, in January 2019. Why is having an office in this region important to Fish?

Carl Bruce: China is, and will continue to be, a critical market for innovation. Fish represents many of the top 25 global tech companies by market cap, and expanding into Shenzhen, the “Silicon Valley” of China, makes good business sense. Since our focus is intellectual property (IP) – we do more of it than anyone else, and we do it better – we wanted to be where some of the leading innovation is taking place. In November 2018, Forbes China put Shenzhen first on its list of the “Top 30 Most Innovative Chinese Cities.” Shenzhen boasts the highest number of Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) applications filed of any city in China. The city is home to some of China’s most innovative companies, which account for almost 50 percent of Chinese PCT filings. We believe it is critical to be able to work with these companies and to meet their needs on the ground, in real
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DISH’s Mike Burg partnered with iDS’s Dan Regard to build a document repository that allows the legal department to be more consistent across matters and leverage previous decisions on repetitive documents.​

CCBJ: Mike, please describe some of the issues that have been on your radar since you joined DISH.  

Mike Burg:  I’ve been managing e-discovery at DISH just about five years. Currently, we’re focused on becoming more efficient and leveraging technology to
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Interview with Steven Maslowski / Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP

Steven Maslowski, an IP litigator at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, handles cases on the cutting edge of life sciences. It’s a complicated place to be these days, as the courts are sorting through changes in the law and litigators are waiting for guidance from the Food and Drug Administration. And it’s all playing to the tune of something called “the patent dance.” The interview has been edited for style and length.
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