A firm known for its focus on intellectual property looks to China and other key Asian markets to expand its client base. 

CCBJ: Fish opened a representative office in Shenzhen, China, in January 2019. Why is having an office in this region important to Fish?

Carl Bruce: China is, and will continue to be, a critical market for innovation. Fish represents many of the top 25 global tech companies by market cap, and expanding into Shenzhen, the “Silicon Valley” of China, makes good business sense. Since our focus is intellectual property (IP) – we do more of it than anyone else, and we do it better – we wanted to be where some of the leading innovation is taking place. In November 2018, Forbes China put Shenzhen first on its list of the “Top 30 Most Innovative Chinese Cities.” Shenzhen boasts the highest number of Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) applications filed of any city in China. The city is home to some of China’s most innovative companies, which account for almost 50 percent of Chinese PCT filings. We believe it is critical to be able to work with these companies and to meet their needs on the ground, in real
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Joe Skalski, director of consulting services for engagement management at FRONTEO, discusses the firm’s unique e-discovery capabilities in the Asia-Pacific region, from its technological skills to the importance of having boots on the ground.
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DISH’s Mike Burg partnered with iDS’s Dan Regard to build a document repository that allows the legal department to be more consistent across matters and leverage previous decisions on repetitive documents.​

CCBJ: Mike, please describe some of the issues that have been on your radar since you joined DISH.  

Mike Burg:  I’ve been managing e-discovery at DISH just about five years. Currently, we’re focused on becoming more efficient and leveraging technology to
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Litigation based on this tort has grown exponentially – and needs to be governed by clear and reasonable standards.

Before the industrial revolution, the tort of public nuisance was easily understood and reasonably applied. Over the past few decades, new technologies and manufacturing processes evolved. The new processes entailed new techniques, substances, waste disposal methods and habits. Public nuisance litigation adapted to deal with these issues and ultimately evolved to encompass the new problems. Plantiffs’ counsel are now using the tort far beyond its traditional limits and expectations – often involving large cities, regions, coastal areas and water supplies.
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Jeffrey Martin and Paul Mastrocola are co-chairs of the business litigation and dispute resolution group at Burns & Levinson. Both are seasoned trial attorneys who know that litigation is sometimes the only option – but certainly not in every case. They often advocate meditation, arbitration or other forms of alternative dispute resolution, always with the goal of efficient and cost-effective outcomes that satisfy all parties involved. The interview has been edited for length and style.
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What do you think of when someone says Delaware? For many people, one word comes to mind: business. That’s where numerous companies are incorporated. If they didn’t already have “First State” on their license plate (Delaware was first to sign the U.S. Constitution), they could just print “The Business State” and people would know where they’re from. 
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Article by David Hechler

There was an early television show called Naked City, and it always ended with this voice-over: “There are eight million stories in the naked city. This has been one of them.” There must be more than eight million in the civil justice litigation docket. Here’s one that highlights an important trend by veering the other way.


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